Friday, March 20, 2009

Buckshot: What I've Been Reading


I think Hooper's going to be starting a similar feature, each time recapping his ten most recent reads. This is sort of a follow-up to my "Year in Books" post; everything I've read since the start of 2009.


The Lost Ones by Christoper Golden -- The conclusion of Golden's Veil Trilogy. Not quite the ending I was expecting, but a very entertaining conclusion all told. This series has been one of the author's more memorable works.

The Monster of Florence by Douglas Preston and Mario Spezi -- A gripping true-crime story in the grand tradition of Erik Larson's The Devil in the White City, full of insane twists and police incompetence. Both authors eventually came under suspicion for being involved with the titular killer, with Spezi even going on trial. A great read.

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Last year, I picked up a nice two-volume paperback set containing all of the Sherlock Holmes novels and short stories. I decided to start off with the best-known Holmes story, and was greatly entertained by the mystery Doyle crafted. I can't wait to get into the rest of the collection and see if he can maintain that level of writing.

Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons -- Decided to read it again before seeing the movie (though maybe I shouldn't have). I still haven't read all of the back-up material though.

Gil's All-Fright Diner by A. Lee Martinez -- When the back cover promises a werewolf and vampire (Duke and Earl, respectively) battling an army of zombies and the impending apocalypse...how do you not buy that book? Martinez's novel is a rousing horror/comedy romp. I don't know if there are any more Duke & Earl novels, or if he's planning any more, but I'll definitely start checking out more of his work.

Infected by Scott Sigler -- Hooper raved about this one, so I checked it out from the library. I'll say one thing for it; it moves at a break-neck pace. And while it's entertaining, I found it hard to relate to any of the characters. Still, the set-ups laid out in the closing chapters did get me to check out the sequel, Contagious.

Crooked Little Vein by Warren Ellis -- Anyone who reads Warren Ellis knows about the "stock Warren Ellis protagonist," and this novel's Mike McGill fits right into that mold. Overall, a disappointing effort. But there are pieces of prose in there that make you wish Ellis could break out of his self-inflicted mold and write something truly great, rather than what boils down to guilty pleasure reading. Pick it up used or from the library if you choose to read it.

Currently, I'm reading Mind the Gap: A Novel of the Hidden Cities by Christopher Golden and Tim Lebbon, and it's off to a good start. If anyone's read any of these novels, feel free to share your thoughts in the comments.


-Buck

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